Durham Repaving Projects

2012 Repaving Project
With funding from recent bonds totaling $37.5 million, Durham is on track to smooth out some of the City’s worst streets by the end of 2012. The City has already made progress by repaving more than 100 miles of streets throughout Durham.

Residents can expect to see work get under way in April 2012 to finish the job - to repave worst streets in the city. Since December 2010, the City has worked to ensure that streets ranked as “poor” or “very poor” are repaved.
The Operation Green Light mascot holding a shovel
Bond Fund Spending
The City is dedicated to continued transparency and accountability as bond funds are spent. In order to complete all repaving projects associated with bond funds:
  • The City is utilizing new bimonthly performance measures to ensure that contractors complete work on time.
  • Contractors are required to have the resources to perform the work during the benchmark periods regardless of bad weather, supply disruptions or any other delays.
  • The City's Public Works Department has hired 4 new inspectors to insure the quality of work performed by the contractors will meet industry standards.
  • The City is working closely with the City’s Department of Water Management and other utilities to efficiently set timelines to identify and complete subsurface repairs or improvements prior to repaving.
Ongoing Street Repaving Funds
There are also plans to build ongoing street repaving funds into future budgets so this deferred maintenance backlog does not occur again. That means the City will be able to maintain streets at a fair or better condition during their 20-year life cycle. Plus, the City’s long-term financial and strategic plans, both of which include ongoing street maintenance, means Durham has a fiscally sound plan for moving forward.

We are committed to smoothing out our streets to continue to make Durham a great place to live, work and play.

Future Planning

In addition to catching up on the remaining backlog of streets in dire need of maintenance, we are making sure that Durham doesn’t get into this situation again.

Beginning this fiscal year, funding will be allocated in the annual operating budget, once the remaining backlog is finished, to stay current going forward. That means that we will be able to maintain streets at a "fair" or better condition during their 20-year life cycle.

In addition, the City’s 5-year financial plan and strategic plan, both of which include ongoing street maintenance, along with a revised capital improvement plan that is more achievable, means that Durham has a fiscally sound plan for moving forward and ensuring Durham’s city streets are well-maintained and fully funded as part of the annual budget process.